October Sal Update #2

The Christmas Stocking that I am supposed to be doing for this SAL hit the back burner these past three weeks. I had another week long intensive course in Tambour last week and I spent the previous two weeks reacquainting myself with my hook. Last week was amazing! Our teacher, Bob Haven, is fantastic. Besides having to drive an hour and a half each way, this class was perfect.

Samples

This is my tambour frame. We were working on silk organza fabric. What you see above is our “sampler” of sorts. We learned different techniques and practiced them.

Wired Flower

This flower shape has wire around the edges so that when cut from the cloth, it can be manipulated and attached to something else to create a 3D item. There are two rows of sequins around the edges and beads done in open vermicelli in the center of the leaves. All are done with the tambour hook.

Flower

This flower has lace appliquéd in the center and then a row of beads around the outside to cover the stitches. Both were done with the tambour hook.

Leaves/Petals

These leaves are also wired around the edge. There are sequins attached to both sides (with the tambour hook – no easy task!) making them reversible. These will also be cut from the cloth and then added to the center of the sequined flower above. Once finished, it can be turned into a brooch, added to a hat or purse, anything really. In my future, I see dragonflies and butterflies done in this method.

Leaf

This leaf was no easy feat. It took approximately 2 and a half hours to complete. The thread was done in a method called Point Tiré which means drawn stitch. Completing this stitch with the tambour hook took lots of practice. I have not taken a picture of the lines of practice! The gems in the middle are called lochrosen and are flat on the back but have a raised center – yes, they are applied with the tambour hook.

Beaded Half-Circle

This was also done with Point Tiré. The line of beads on the outside of this semi-circle is plain tambour. The radiating lines are Point Tiré. By now the stitch was pretty easy; however, getting the beads to lay flat and where they were supposed to be was a challenge. The look is very nice though.

Leather and pearls

First we were given a piece of leather and told to stitch it down with needle and thread. The leather needed to be stitched so that there was a “hump” in the middle, it was not to be stitched flat. After that, small stitches were taken in the middle of the “hump” to create interesting texture from the folds. Shatong gems were added to the leather with needle and thread, then the pearls were done with the tambour hook around the outside edge.

Lace

The last thing we were given was a piece of lace and told to embellish it. There a several different techniques used and I’m quite happy with the result. For homework, we are to design something for a wearable. I have a few different ideas and will start to draft a pattern this week. It should be fun although I see lots of ripping in my future as I experiment.

The Christmas Stocking will make an appearance on my next post for this SAL. I plan on working on it every night while the hubby and I watch our shows!

Please take a look at the other talented stitchers taking part in this SAL:

AvisClaireGunChristinaKathyMargaretHeidiJackieSunnyMeganDeborahSharonDaisyAJCathieLindaHelenConnieCindyMaryMargaret

Needle Lace Workshop

I’m addicted to these SFSNAD classes!! This class is all about needle lace. The most interesting part to me, is that we are creating lace pieces that can be taken off the fabric and used for different purposes.

Cordonnet

This is called a Cordonnet. It is what all the lace stitches will be attached to. The lace stitches will not go through the ground fabric, they will be wrapped around the cordonnet at the edges.

Brussels Stitch with Return.

This was the first technique we learned and give a really solid appearance. We learned how to change colors within the lace as well.

Brussels With Return – the return thread has been replaced with gold thread.

This one was super fun to make and I love the look of it. I will find a reason to use this in the future.

Trellis Stitch.

This one was a little harder to do. I still need lots of practice to get an even look and to have the “knots” line up. Even though the are offset, they should line up.

Brussels with Return.

We were using quite a thick thread so this is quite dense. With a thinner thread it would look much better and a lot more lacy.

Spiral Trellis Stitch

This one still needs to be finished but is very enjoyable.

Stumpwork Jester

The classes offered at SFSNAD are soooo very interesting and I am loving learning so many new things. This class is in four parts spaced one each week for four weeks.

Stumpwork Jester – class taught by Lauren Yaeger.

This piece is padded and needle lace is created for the clothing. Exciting right?!!

In our first class, we learned how to create the felt under piece. This is stitched down and then stuffed. Musculature is added once it is stuffed. Getting this stuffed, completely stitched down and the musculature added is my homework.

Blackwork Class

I’m really enjoying taking embroidery classes at the San Francisco School of Needlework and Design. They have great teachers and interesting classes. I love learning new embroidery techniques.

Blackwork Class at SFSNAD.

This was a two day class that went over all the different stitches that we would find in this kit. My progress so far:

The stitching is really meditative and easy.

So far, this star stitch is my favorite. It has the most steps, but I just love the look of it!! It’s going to take me awhile to complete this project!

March One Monthly Goal

WHEW!! I’m getting this done right at the wire!! I couldn’t decide on what I would do for my One Monthly Goal for Elm Street Quilts. I finally decided on this:

Needle Lace Hand

I will finish this Needle Lace Hand. This is part of a much bigger project. There is a challenge being run over at the San Francisco School of Needlework and Design that I have entered. There are many elements that I have drawn out and planned, but this is the first element to finish. The hand is a tracing of my youngest daughter’s (19yo) hand. I have three daughters so will needle lace each of them and myself. I have something else planned for the boys in the family and will show that at a later date.

Postcard Fabric Art (PFA)-February

I had so much fun with the January PFA challenge, I have decided to join in for the February challenge. This time we are making “Cheesecloth Skins“. For this challenge, I did go out and buy the Liquitex Acryic Matte Medium.

Because this is a rather messy project, I brought out the art trays I used for my kids when they were young and also for kids’ art classes. I followed the instructions and taped down freezer paper with the shiny side up.

Then the Matte Medium is poured onto the freezer paper.

I used a sponge brush to cover the freezer paper with the Liquitex and placed the cheesecloth on top.

After the cheesecloth is smoothed out, more Liquitex is brushed on top until the entire piece of cheesecloth is saturated.

This is the same process except that words are added to the freezer paper with a sharpie pen before any of the Liquitex is added. The words are supposed to be transferred onto the cloth once the Liquitex is dry. Hopefully this works because I have an idea in mind for a different challenge being put on by the San Francisco School of Needlework and Design.

The next step in this process, after the Liquitex dries, is to paint the cheesecloth. Once it’s dry, it’s ready to be used. I can’t wait to see if all of this works and to try painting the cloth. This has sparked so many ideas in my mind!!

Embroidery

I am continuing to take classes at the San Francisco School of Needlework and Design. Their classes are amazing and their teachers are wonderful. Somehow they have managed to seamlessly move to teaching on zoom.

This is the most recent class that I am taking. I have finished the first of two classes and am enjoying it immensely. This is on needle painting and we are using the long and short stitch. I really struggle with this stitch and am looking forward to more practice and direction.

This is my progress after the first class. Homework is to finish all the stems and that one leaf before the next class. We are working on silk fabric which is really nice. At our next class we will work on one of the flowers. I can’t wait!!

Linking up with Kathy for Slow Sunday Stitching.

Whitework Embroidery

I’ve been trying my hand at different types of embroidery. The San Francisco School of Needlework and Design has been offering classes and stitch ins during SIP and I have been really enjoying myself. Hopefully, they will continue some classes online once everything opens up again. My most current finished piece is in whitework.

Whitework (class from San Francisco School of Needlework & Design)

I love the simplicity of white thread on white fabric. My very favorite part of this piece is the center. It’s a pulled stitch called Diagonal Cross Filling. The stitch is very easy to do and the effect is lovely.

I’m not in love with my eyelets. I had a really tough time with these. I drew a circle where the eyelet was to be, cut an “x” in the middle, and then whip stitched the edge with one strand of floss. We were told to come up only once in each hole around the outside and then down in the middle of the eyelet. I found that if I did that, I did not get full coverage so I came up more than once in many holes which then left it’s own little gap.

I did really enjoy the couching on the trailing stitch (the stems). That took forever. The longest stem (to the flower) I did as instructed with only one strand of floss. The second stem (the one to the leaf) I stitched with two threads – more to see how it would look than anything else. I like it, but I was surprised to see that there is definitely an obvious difference between couching with one thread and two. Not bad, but different. It was also much quicker to stitch and I was able to use only one hole per pass.

Another thing that is bugging me. Both the floss and the perle are white; however, on my project they look quite different in color. My hands were squeaky clean, but maybe I had some oils left on them anyway? Also I’m wondering if using a pencil may not have been the right way to mark my fabric – the graphite could have colored the thread as well.

Back of work where the threads that were couched have been pulled through.

This is the back where the threads that I used (4) were couched and then the ends – both top and bottom of stem – were pulled through to the back. Our instructor told us to cut them off even with the fabric. I am scared to do this!!! What will keep them from popping through to the top of the work? I’m going to email my teacher with both pictures to see if I can get come clarification.

Today I’m linking up with Kathy over at Kathy’s Quilts for Slow Stitch Sunday.